Articles Posted in Learn

Societal issues, world events, and things to think on.

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By: Carolyn J. Woodruff, JD, CPA, CVA

When it comes to recognizing and remembering iconic women who have served in the Judicial branch, three names come to mind.

  • NC Supreme Court Justice Susie Marshall Sharp
  • Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor
  • And of course, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

This year in honor of Women’s History Month, Woodruff Family Law Group published three blogs on these trail blazing Justices whose work was transformative in North Carolina and in the nation. Continue reading

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By: Hannah E. Smith, JD

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the late iconic Supreme Court Justice, took the nation’s highest court’s dress from drab to fab with her unique collection of collars.  “The standard robe is made for a man because it has a place for the shirt to show, and the tie,” Ginsburg told the Washington Post in 2009.  As a result, she and Sandra Day O’Connor, as the first and second women to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court, thought it would be befitting to jazz up the robe in a womanly fashion.  Ginsburg, who was 87 when she died on September 18, 2020, became known for subtly encoding meaning in the collars she chose to wear on any given occasion.  Her collection began with an original lace jabot, which she frequently wore while on the bench from 1993 to 2008.  However, over the years, her law clerks, colleagues, and other admirers helped her grow her collection with an impressive array of exquisite collars.  Time Magazine was granted access to some of the late Justice’s favorite collars for a still-life series, which can be viewed here.  A few of her most popular collars are described in detail below. Continue reading

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Ideas: On the 19th Amendment: My Vote, My Equality
Part II of III

January 10, 1918: In 1918, the U.S. House of Representatives. voted 274 to 136, two-thirds only by one vote to pass the 19th Amendment. Remember Jeannette Rankin of Montana who, a year earlier, had become the first woman in the House of Representatives, implored: “How shall we answer their challenge, gentlemen: how shall we explain to them the meaning of democracy if the same Congress that voted for war to make the world safe for democracy refuses to give this small measure of democracy to women of our country?”

June 7, 1918, President Wilson answered the concerned letter of Mrs. Catts, one of approximately 30 she wrote to the President.

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Ideas: On the 19th Amendment: My Vote, My Equality
Part I of III: Background

Individual letters have moved history and votes. Before tweeting and social media,  penned (or penciled) letters were an excellent persuasive tool.  This blog is in three parts: Part I deals with Suffrage and background on the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Part II considers a letter that moved Congress into action by moving a President of the United States. Part III deals with a penciled letter of a Mother to a Son, and that one letter sealed the deal on the 19th Amendment granting finally women the right to vote. Continue reading

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By: Carolyn J. Woodruff, JD, CPA, CVA

Divorce is mostly negative energy. Why not have a Sage Smudging Divorce Party for you and your besties to get rid of the negative energy? So, you kept the marital residence: I did that, and I found the constant reminder of my ex dragging my sensuality to my retained home a drag. One of my closest friends was familiar with Sage Smudging suggested this sage ritual. And, it worked: we took a wrapped “stick” of sage, a feather, and moved throughout the corners of the retained marital residence ridding the house of its ghosts and bad vibes. You can do this with a group of friends and a special cocktail. Continue reading

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By: Carolyn Woodruff, JD, CPA, CVA

In the year 2020, creatures run rampant

Sounds of warfare without guns

Hands contagious

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Carolyn Woodruff

The fourteenth amendment of the United States Constitution creates the Parental Rights Doctrine. It is fundamental to our society that parents have the right to raise their children and the average American, I believe, has a longstanding commitment to parental rights. Except in extreme circumstances, parents have the fundamental right to parent a child and decide what is in the best interests of their own child (this article doesn’t address custody disputes between two good parents each of whom has a fundamental right to parent). This article does address the fundamental rights of parents over CPS.

In further advancement of the Parental Rights Doctrine, the United States Supreme Court has had moments of brilliance on this issue. For example, in Troxel v. Granville, 530 US 57 (2000), the United States Supreme Court aptly stated: “The liberty interest at issue in this case—the interest of parents in the care, custody, and control of their children—is perhaps the oldest of the fundamental liberty interests recognized by this Court.”

So where has the societal shift happened that has placed CPS so squarely in the middle of this fundamental right to parent? I believe the shift happened with the passage of the Adoptions and Safe Families Act of 1997 during the Clinton administration. In my opinion, that Act needs to be abolished and we need to return to the Social Worker Model for CPS, as contrasted to the current Law Enforcement Model. The Social Worker Model is “working with others to accomplish a goal.” Perhaps the CPS worker would suggest a needed service, such as counseling through Family Service of the Piedmont, a great organization.

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Venn Crawford

This year, Dwight and Carolyn have embarked on a new adventure – vegetable gardening. Far from any farmland, the dynamic duo has set up shop on their two balconies, where they’re growing shishito peppers and tomatoes.

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What are Shishito Peppers?

Shishito peppers are a mild Asian variety of pepper. When sautéed, they make for a delicious, healthy appetizer. As a result, they’re quickly gaining popularity with vegetable gardeners and foodies alike.

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Venn Crawford

How many things went into your trash can last night? How many of them were plastic?

On average, Americans throw away 4.4 lbs of trash a day. That ends up being about 1600 lbs a year. Now, think about what’s in that trash: packaging for food, empty bottles, napkins, clothing tags, broken toys, and so on. Most of that stuff is made of plastic.

Plastic is forever.

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